Home Plumbing System: All You Need to Know!

Within our homes are a number of systems that are essential to daily living, yet we tend to take them for granted.

These include our electrical systems, heating and light, and one that is practically hidden but among the most important of all – the plumbing system.

It’s interesting to consider that the way a home plumbing system works has changed very little since they were first seen in the 1840’s.

However, even 100 years later at least half the homes in the USA did not have running water.

Nowadays the professional plumber like Tyco Plumbing has many customers, each of whom have a full plumbing system in the house.

So, how does it work? That’s what we’re going to look at. Before we begin, it’s important to explain that your plumbing actually consists of two sub-systems: the water supply that comes into the house, and the drainage and wastes system the takes used water away.

We’ll begin by looking at the water supply.

Domestic Water Supply

You will not see a great deal of the plumbing equipment that performs the duty of bringing water into your home. The pipes are buried and usually under the floor for convenience.

Where does the water come from? It is brought to your home from a reservoir by a series of pipes. It will probably pass through at least one filtering station.

It will be under some pressure to come into the home so that it can be piped upwards.

Within the home, your domestic cold-water supply is powered entirely by gravity. The tank containing your water is up high – in the attic or roof space – so that when you turn on your faucet it follows nature and flows downwards.

For hot water, your cold-water system supplies water – again by gravity – to a tank with a heater, where the water is heated to a prescribed temperature.

That is it: it really is a case of getting the water into the house, and then letting gravity do the rest!

Where Your Water is Used

Now that we know part of how a plumbing system works we can briefly look at the areas and appliances in the house that use it, and they can be as follows:

  • Kitchen sink units
  • Bathrooms
  • Washing machines
  • Dishwashers
  • Shower rooms
  • Outdoor taps and other water features

Each of these takes a direct supply from your cold-water system. Now let’s have a look at the waste water subsystem.

Waste Water System

Waste Water System

Getting waste water out of the home is as important as getting fresh water in. Whether you are on a mains sewer system or a septic tank, the system is similar.

The difference between the fresh water system and the waste water is that the latter does not need to be pressurized.

All the pipes that tale waste water away from the house slope downwards. This continues until they reach the mains sewer – which takes the waste to its eventual destination – or the septic tank.

So, when you unplug the bath or flush the toilet, the water flows away naturally. There are vents in the system and filters that help your waste water pipes perform the job, but it is as simple as can be.

Conclusion

That’s all there is to your domestic plumbing system and for simple jobs you can do them yourself if you are competent.

If not, you need to find a local plumbing services provider who can do the jobs you need, and carry out annual maintenance and checks on your home plumbing.

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